You Are Viewing

A Blog Post

“Once when Doc …

“Once when Doc was at the University of Chicago he had love trouble and he had worked too hard. He thought it would be nice to take a very long walk. He put on a little knapsack and he walked through Indiana and Kentucky and North Carolina and Georgia clear to Florida. He walked among farmers and mountain people, among the swamp people and fishermen. And everywhere people asked him why he was walking though the country.
Because he loved true things he tried to explain. He said he was nervous and besides he wanted to see the country, smell the ground and look at grass and birds and trees, to savor the country, and there was no other way to do it save on foot. And people didn’t like him for telling the truth. They scowled, or shook and tapped their heads, they laughed as though they knew it was a lie and they appreciated a liar. And some, afraid for their daughters or their pigs, told him to move on, to get going, just not to stop near their place if he knew what was good for him.
And so he stopped trying to tell the truth. He said he was doing it on a bet–that he stood to win a hundred dollars. Everyone liked him then and believed him. They asked him in to dinner and gave him a bed and they put lunches up for him and wished him good luck and thought he was a hell of a fine fellow. Doc still loved true things but he knew it was not a general love and it could be a very dangerous mistress.” –John Steinbeck, Cannery Row

Author John Steinbeck writes about truth through his character Doc in Cannery Row.  While this novel is fiction, it holds several passages that ring true and are in fact are built upon actual occurrences from Steinbeck or his friends’ lives.  This one, for instance, is taken directly from Ed Ricketts’s life–the real life man behind the character of Doc.

Where do you find truth?  And do you share it with others?

Leave a Reply

Have an Epic Day!